Categorieën
IDEA Mensenrechten Nieuwsbericht

Adapting Elections to COVID: five key questions for decision makers

The global spread of Covid-19 has already profoundly impacted the health and welfare of citizens around the world. Decisions being made about how elections are run during the pandemic will have a further profound effect, shaping the health of democracy in the future.

Many policy makers have responded to the pandemic by postponing elections, with at least fifty-five countries and territories between February and May 2020, rescheduling the polls.  Postponing an election is not quite as undemocratic as it sounds but others have forged on by trying to adapt elections to the pandemic – or are actively trying to find ways to do this.  This has included proposals to hold all-postal elections in Poland, encouraging early voting in South Korea or the use of protective clothing by electoral officials in Israel.  A coalition of US academics have set out proposals for fair elections in November 2020.

Decisions are usually best made to suit local circumstances and pressures.  There are some universal questions that we can ask about the running of elections, however.  In a recent book on Comparative Electoral Management I set out a framework for evaluating the running of elections. This framework is set out in full in chapter 4, which is free to download here (p.61-71).   This framework can also be used to consider the merits – or otherwise – of the reforms being put forward.

The starting point is that elections are not entirely different in nature to other public services such as schools and hospitals.  Some of the tools that have been used to assess them can therefore be adapted to assess how elections are run.  At the heart of the electoral process, however, is democracy.  David Beetham’s focus on a democratic society as one where the key principles of political quality and popular control of government are achieved therefore provides a normative anchor for how we should assess the electoral process.  The framework sets out five dimensions of electoral management that are essential for democratic ideals (Figure 1 and Table 1).

Figure 1: The PROSeS Framework.  Source: James (2020: p.61).

Table 1: The PROSeS matrix for evaluating electoral management. Source: James (2020: p.66).

Firstly, we should focus on the decision-making processes in place for electoral management bodies.  If elections are going to be made for COVID the question is not just what decision is made, but how that decision is made and by whom?  Good electoral management requires that these decisions are not just made behind closed doors by senior electoral officials – or that a small clique of politicians dictate new rules from Parliament.  There should be widespread consultation and public involvement.  In emergency situations the extensiveness of public deliberations can often curtailed by time, but a wide variety of stakeholders should be consulted and a digital society now enables calls for views from the public, focus groups and public polls.  The probity of the decisions made and accountability mechanisms in place should be considered too.

Secondly, the resourcing of any reforms is vitally important.  A decision, for example, to switch from holding elections in person at a polling station to rely on mail-in ballots is going to have a major consequence for staffing levels, working practices, postage and printing costs.  Who is going to pay for this?  When?  Do electoral officials have sufficient financial resources, staff and equipment to implement the reforms?  The sufficiency of this funding is vitally important so that electoral officials don’t find themselves with cash crises during the electoral process – or find themselves with unfunded blackholes afterwards.   We should expect the unexpected.  The availability of contingency funds is therefore vitally important too. 

Thirdly, the quality of services to the citizen have an obvious importance.  ‘Put the voter first’ is a common mantra for electoral services around the world – but there is a major risk that the service provided will be compromised during these difficult times.  Convenience is critically important.  Information about how to vote should be readily available and the process as simple and streamlined as possible.  Accuracy is critical.  The pressures on electoral officials will be immense, but there should be no compromises when voters consider whether their vote had been counted.  Putting the voter first also means enforcing the rules against them and their fellow citizens.  If polling stations are required to close at 7pm then they should close at 7pm.  If postal votes need to have been received by a certain date, then that date should be absolute. 

Fourthly, the likely effects of any COVID reforms should be mapped against service outcomes.  The service outcomes for private companies are usually profit, share value and revenue.  When it comes to the implementation of the electoral process service outcomes are no less relevant.  They would include voter turnout.  Elections held during a pandemic are likely to be hit by a drop in turnout because citizens might be reluctant to travel to the poll and there is therefore a strong case for compensatory mechanisms to ensure inclusive elections.  Electoral officials, of course, are unable to shape this key metric alone as it depends on many factors.  But how the election is run is one of them.  The accuracy and completeness of the electoral register are essential for well-run elections and many countries rely on the canvassing of properties to keep registers accurate.  However, South Africa was amongst many countries to have to suspend voter registration initiatives in response to the pandemic leaving the register likely to be affected.   How reforms might shape the volume of rejected ballot papers, levels of electoral fraud, possible service denial or ignite violence all need measurement and consideration too.

Fifth, stakeholder satisfaction is crucial to the electoral process.  Citizens are one obvious stakeholder and their satisfaction with any reforms that are made should therefore be considered and monitored.  Satisfaction amongst parties and civil society is crucial for ensuring support in the democratic system and is likely to require cross-party working.  Often forgotten is the level of staff satisfaction amongst the electoral officials on the ground.  Staff satisfaction matters for instrumental reasons. The effects are commonly thought to include improved retention and performance. There are also moral reasons: organisations have a duty of care towards their employees – especially where there could be physical risks to their health during the pandemic.

There are no easy solutions for policy makers through these logistical and moral mazes when decisions have to be made within short time frames.  It is clear, however, that the election will affect all citizens, civil society groups and political actors.  Better decisions will therefore be made where the decision-making process is as inclusive and consultative as possible.  And anchoring decisions against democratic principles is imperative.

Categorieën
IDEA Mensenrechten Nieuwsbericht

The COVID-19 Electoral Landscape in Africa

Disclaimer: Views expressed in this commentary are those of the author, who is a staff member of International IDEA. This commentary is independent of specific national or political interests. Views expressed do not necessarily represent the institutional position of International IDEA, its Board of Advisers or its Council of Member States.

Burundians will go to the polls on 20 May 2020 for presidential, legislative and local elections in spite of the risks posed by the coronavirus. As of 17 May, there were 27 confirmed cases of coronavirus and one death in the country, but the total figure of cases is believed to be higher. Since late April, large scale campaign events have taken place throughout the country without much attention to social distancing practices. This despite concerns voiced by the World Health Organization (WHO) which was on 12 May 2020 asked to immediately leave the country. In the meantime, the government has also asked that all foreign election observers to be quarantined for a 14-day period.

What does the pandemic mean for the electoral landscape in Africa, with 23 national elections scheduled in 22 African countries in 2020? For the rests of the year, there are elections scheduled to take place in Malawi (presidential), in July; Burkina Faso, Côte d’Ivoire, Egypt, Guinea (presidential), Liberia, Niger, Seychelles and Tanzania. It is not certain whether the elections in Chad, Central Africa Republic (CAR), Gabon, Somalia and Somaliland will take place as scheduled because these countries are faced with broader security and political challenges, now complicated by the pandemic.

Changes to scheduled elections

In early May, the chief electoral officer of the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC), South Africa stated, “there is no doubt that the post-COVID-19 electoral landscape will be significantly different in many respects.” These words were expressed at a time when the IEC postponed 30 municipal by-elections and voter registration activities until 1 June 2020, to mitigate the risk of further contagion and the likelihood of a low voter turnout. The IEC further mentioned in case the risks of cross contamination of people does not dissipate, the municipal elections scheduled to take place in 2021 may be affected.

According to International IDEA Global Overview of COVID-19: Impact on elections a total of eight countries have decided to postpone national and subnational elections planned in March up until August 2020. This includes subnational elections in Gambia, Kenya, Nigeria, Tunisia, Uganda, Zimbabwe as well as national elections in Ethiopia. Many of these postponements were decided on by the respective governments, legislatures or Electoral Management Bodies (EMBs), based on emergency response frameworks. In the case of Ethiopia, the National Electoral Board of Ethiopia consulted with political parties on the impact of COVID-19 which resulted in a broad political consensus regarding the postponement of the election.

During the same period, 4 countries have held national or subnational elections. This includes Guinea (22 March), Cameroon (22 March), Mali (29 March and 19 April) and Benin (17 May). All elections took place during a context of contagion with 2 reported cases in Guinea, 40 cases in Cameroon, 18 cases/224 cases (first and second round) in Mali and 338 cases in Benin.

Figure 1. Elections held or postponed from 21 Februrary to 17 May                                                                                       

 

Elections held so far:

Protective measures were employed for all four elections that were held amidst the pandemic in BeninCameroon, Guinea and Mali. These measures included: deep cleaning of polling stations before, during and after polling; mandatory use of masks and gloves for election officials; temperature checks at polling stations; provision of handwashing facilities and sanitizers for voters at polling stations; social distancing at the polling stations; and restrictions on number of persons present per room during voting and counting was done in centralized locations. Of particular interest is Benin, where all in-person campaign events were canceled, as gatherings of over 50 people were prohibited, forcing candidates to focus more on media appearances and campaign posters.

Voter turnout for the Guinea and Mali election (see figure 1) was low in comparison to past elections. For example, the Guinea provisional voter turnout was 58 per cent, which was lower than 68.4 per cent in the 2015 presidential election. In Mali, voter turnout for the first round elections on 29 March was 35.58 per cent, which dropped to 35.25 per cent in the second round parliamentary elections held on 19 April. Turnout in the 2020 elections was low compared to 42.7 per cent in the 2013 parliamentary election (See figure 2, Guinea and Mali VT). Provisional voter turnout for Benin local elections during the time of writing has not been released.

Figure 2. Guinea and Mali Voter Turnout                                                       

 

There have been reports of further contagion during the election period. As of 17 May 2020 coronavirus cases in each country has increased. Guinea has 2658 coronavirus cases including 16 deaths; Cameroon has 3105 cases and 140 deaths; and Mali 860 cases and 52 deaths. In each of the aforementioned countries, the cases of coronavirus started to grow rapidly in the weeks after the elections as illustrated by Worldometer country data/graphs. The President of INEC, died from COVID-19 on 17 April 2020, it is believed that he contracted the virus during the election period.

Elections in the second half of the year

For the rest of 2020, there are more than a dozen scheduled national, regional or local elections in Africa. Elections are continuous processes that involved a complex interplay of activities that are technical in nature but carry deep political and legal implications. The quality of an election management body’s (EMB) preparation for an election is crucial for the overall success of the process. The pandemic has necessitated varying degrees of restrictions and emergency measures, imposed by governments, thus affecting the implementation of important pre-election activities.

In the cases of Burkina Faso, Cote d’Ivoire, Malawi, Niger and Ghana some electoral preparations have been delayed or postponed. These include the voter registration, the training of staff, local commissioners and electoral agents. Party Primary elections in Ghana have also been postponed. These postponements may cause overall changes in the election calendar.

EMBs in many sub-Saharan African countries depend largely on international procurement of sensitive election materials, as the capacity to produce locally is not readily available. The closure of international borders and of production centres in the supplying markets in response to the pandemic make international procurement a challenge, as seen in Liberia.

Can we still hold safe elections?

Many countries outside Africa that have either postponed, held or are planning to hold elections in 2020 have looked at Special Voting Arrangements (SVA) as an option that can allow elections to take place during a time of contagion. For example, local EMBs in Bavaria, Germany and the USA have introduced postal voting for subnational elections.

While the infrastructure in Africa may not support postal and online voting, other SVAs could be considered. South Africa and some other countries have SVAs for the elderly, the invalid and persons on election duty. The special voting allows these vulnerable voters to vote in advance (two days earlier), it also provides the possibility of home visits. Such SVAs could allow for staggered voting to reduce the pressure on voters on election day. However, in the context of the pandemic, the home visits should be modified to reduce the human contact between the officials and the voters who are at risk of contracting the virus. Mauritius which has voting by proxy could potentially extend the SVA to the elderly or persons who are infected by COVID-19.

In March 2020, International IDEA published a technical paper that lists some alternative mechanisms of campaigning and remote voting methods. This includes campaigning through Internet or via social media platforms or voting by post or online through a computer or mobile phone application. If postal or online voting is deemed inappropriate, then other in-person arrangements can be made in order to decrease the risk of contagion. This includes either introducing advance voting or extending advance voting arrangements to a larger group of people if the election code allows. In South Korea, the National Election Commission (NEC) encouraged all voters to cast their vote before election day at any of the 3,500 polling stations that were setup throughout the country. The rational for early voting was to allow a large group of people to vote before election day irrespective of their residence. In the end 26.69 per cent (or 11.74 million) of voters cast their vote through early voting provisions. This measure reduced the risk contagion as less people gathered together to vote on election day. It also reduced voter disenfranchisement and contributed to a historic high 66.2 per cent (29.12 million ballots cast)voter turnout in the country.

If new voting arrangements are proposed, or enacted good practice dictates that new laws need to be agreed typically between six months (as per article 2 of the ECOWAS protocol on Good Governance) to one year (as per Venice Commission, code of good practice in electoral matters) before elections take place, in order to uphold the principle of electoral law stability. A distinction should be made of what represents a major change in the electoral system and what are relatively more technical aspects that an EMB can adopt in a shorter period of time. Broad consensus of new voting arrangements will increase the integrity of the election and its eventual outcome. Therefore, all countries planning to hold elections in 2020 or early 2021 during a time of contagion need to start discussing these arrangements across party lines and through inter-agency forums as soon as possible.

Categorieën
IDEA Mensenrechten Nieuwsbericht

Adapting Elections to COVID-19: five key questions for decision makers

Disclaimer: Views expressed in this commentary are those of the author, who is a staff member of International IDEA. This commentary is independent of specific national or political interests. Views expressed do not necessarily represent the institutional position of International IDEA, its Board of Advisers or its Council of Member States.

The global spread of COVID-19 has already profoundly impacted the health and welfare of citizens around the world. Decisions being made about how elections are run during the pandemic will have a further profound effect, shaping the health of democracy in the future.

Many policymakers have responded to the pandemic by postponing elections, with at least fifty-five countries and territories between February and May 2020, rescheduling the polls. Postponing an election is not quite as undemocratic as it sounds but others have forged on by trying to adapt elections to the pandemic—or are actively trying to find ways to do this. This has included proposals to hold all-postal elections in Poland, encouraging early voting in South Korea or the use of protective clothing by electoral officials in Israel. A coalition of US academics have set out proposals for fair elections in November 2020.

Decisions are usually best made to suit local circumstances and pressures. There are some universal questions that we can ask about the running of elections, however. In a recent book on Comparative Electoral Management, I set out a framework for evaluating the running of elections. This framework is set out in full in Chapter 4, which is free to download here (p.61-71). This framework can also be used to consider the merits—or otherwise—of the reforms being put forward.

The starting point is that elections are not entirely different in nature to other public services such as schools and hospitals. Some of the tools that have been used to assess them can therefore be adapted to assess how elections are run. At the heart of the electoral process, however, is democracy. David Beetham’s focus on a democratic society as one where the key principles of political quality and popular control of government are achieved therefore provides a normative anchor for how we should assess the electoral process. The framework sets out five dimensions of electoral management that are essential for democratic ideals (Figure 1 and Table 1).

Figure 1: The PROSeS Framework. Source: James (2020: 61).

 

 

Table 1: The PROSeS matrix for evaluating electoral management. Source: James (2020: 66).

 

Firstly, we should focus on the decision-making processes in place for electoral management bodies. If decisions are going to be made due to COVID-19, the question is not just what decision is made, but how that decision is made and by whom? Good electoral management requires that these decisions are not just made behind closed doors by senior electoral officials—or that a small clique of politicians dictate new rules from Parliament. There should be widespread consultation and public involvement. In emergency situations the extensiveness of public deliberations can often curtailed by time, but a wide variety of stakeholders should be consulted and a digital society now enables calls for views from the public, focus groups and public polls. The probity of the decisions made and accountability mechanisms in place should be considered too.

Secondly, the resourcing of any reforms is vitally important. A decision, for example, to switch from holding elections in person at a polling station to rely on mail-in ballots is going to have a major consequence for staffing levels, working practices, postage and printing costs. Who is going to pay for this? When? Do electoral officials have sufficient financial resources, staff and equipment to implement the reforms? The sufficiency of this funding is vitally important so that electoral officials don’t find themselves with cash crises during the electoral process—or find themselves with unfunded blackholes afterwards. We should expect the unexpected. The availability of contingency funds is therefore vitally important too. 

Thirdly, the quality of services to the citizen have an obvious importance. ‘Put the voter first’ is a common mantra for electoral services around the world—but there is a major risk that the service provided will be compromised during these difficult times. Convenience is critically important. Information about how to vote should be readily available and the process as simple and streamlined as possible. Accuracy is critical. The pressures on electoral officials will be immense, but there should be no compromises when voters consider whether their vote had been counted. Putting the voter first also means enforcing the rules against them and their fellow citizens. If polling stations are required to close at 19:00, then they should close at 19:00. If postal votes need to have been received by a certain date, then that date should be absolute. 

Fourthly, the likely effects of any COVID-19 reforms should be mapped against service outcomes. The service outcomes for private companies are usually profit, share value and revenue. When it comes to the implementation of the electoral process service outcomes are no less relevant. They would include voter turnout. Elections held during a pandemic are likely to be hit by a drop in turnout because citizens might be reluctant to travel to the poll and there is therefore a strong case for compensatory mechanisms to ensure inclusive elections. Electoral officials, of course, are unable to shape this key metric alone as it depends on many factors. But how the election is run is one of them. The accuracy and completeness of the electoral register are essential for well-run elections and many countries rely on the canvassing of properties to keep registers accurate. However, South Africa was amongst many countries to have to suspend voter registration initiatives in response to the pandemic leaving the register likely to be affected. How reforms might shape the volume of rejected ballot papers, levels of electoral fraud, possible service denial or ignite violence all need measurement and consideration too.

Fifth, stakeholder satisfaction is crucial to the electoral process. Citizens are one obvious stakeholder and their satisfaction with any reforms that are made should therefore be considered and monitored. Satisfaction amongst parties and civil society is crucial for ensuring support in the democratic system and is likely to require cross-party working. Often forgotten is the level of staff satisfaction amongst the electoral officials on the ground. Staff satisfaction matters for instrumental reasons. The effects are commonly thought to include improved retention and performance. There are also moral reasons: organizations have a duty of care towards their employees—especially where there could be physical risks to their health during the pandemic.

There are no easy solutions for policymakers through these logistical and moral mazes when decisions have to be made within short time frames. It is clear, however, that the election will affect all citizens, civil society groups and political actors. Better decisions will therefore be made where the decision-making process is as inclusive and consultative as possible. And anchoring decisions against democratic principles is imperative.

Categorieën
Mensenrechten Nieuwsbericht PAX

PAX steunt spoedadvies Corona aanpak Adviesraad Internationale Vraagstukken

18-05-2020

De Adviesraad Internationale Vraagstukken (AIV) heeft op verzoek van de regering een spoedadvies opgesteld over de Nederlandse inzet bij het bestrijden van de coronacrisis in kwetsbare landen.

Ook is er steeds meer inzicht ontstaan in hoe ontwikkelingsbeleid, mensenrechtenbeleid en inzet op veiligheid en rechtsorde met elkaar samen moeten hangen. PAX waardeert dan ook de inzet van het advies op de pijlers: noodhulp, inclusiviteit en een humaan vluchtelingenbeleid en raadt de regering aan het advies over te nemen.  

Burgers in conflictgebieden zijn extra kwetsbaar

De coronacrisis raakt ons allen, maar het raakt ons niet gelijk. Gender, leeftijd en sociaaleconomische positie zijn markers van fysieke kwetsbaarheid voor het covid-19-virus, maar bepalen ook de toegang tot gezondheidszorg, informatie en zeggenschap in besluitvorming over de crisisrespons. In fragiele landen waar al jaren sprake is van gewapend conflict en geweld, zijn mensen extra kwetsbaar voor de gevolgen van het virus. PAX is blij met het advies van de AIV om 1 miljard euro vrij te maken uit algemene middelen voor noodhulp, voedselhulp en het opzetten van een sociaal vangnet.

Inclusieve crisisaanpak

Een uitdaging waar het ministerie van Buitenlandse Zaken en maatschappelijke organisaties samen voor staan is: hoe kunnen we de opgedane ervaring en geleerde lessen over internationale samenwerking, en met name de rol van het maatschappelijk middenveld daarin, ook in deze crisissituatie toepassen? In de afgelopen jaren heeft het ministerie structureel ingezet op het versterken van de stem van burgers. Iets waar PAX veel waarde aan hecht in al haar programma’s. Ook is er steeds meer inzicht ontstaan in hoe ontwikkelingsbeleid, mensenrechtenbeleid en inzet op veiligheid en rechtsorde met elkaar samen dienen te hangen. De AIV heeft zelf onlangs nog geadviseerd om deze beleidsterreinen verder te integreren, om zo de Duurzame Ontwikkelingsdoelen (SDG’s) te verwezenlijken.  De ervaringen en inzichten van de afgelopen jaren zouden nu leidend moeten zijn voor een effectieve respons op de gevolgen van de coronacrisis op korte en middellange termijn. Het betrekken van alle bevolkingsgroepen hierbij is essentieel. Zeer terecht geeft de AIV aan dat ook voor de lange termijn voldoende middelen beschikbaar moeten zijn.

Opvang en bescherming vluchtelingen

Het belang van een humaan en solidair vluchtelingenbeleid in het advies wordt door PAX toegejuicht. Solidariteit met andere EU lidstaten houdt wat PAX betreft ook in om actief deel te nemen aan een oproep zoals zeven maanden geleden door Griekenland werd gedaan om een groep vluchtelingenkinderen op te nemen vanuit de overvolle vluchtelingenkampen. Linken naar: 

Categorieën
Mensenrechten Nieuwsbericht PAX

Omgaan met het verleden is de kern van vooruitgang

15-05-2020

Net een paar maanden bezig als algemeen directeur bij PAX vindt Anna Timmerman zich thuiswerkend terug onder de hoogslaper van haar zoon. Ver weg van Irak, Zuid-Soedan, Oekraïne en Colombia, duizenden kilometers van de gebieden waar PAX werkt. Ze was er graag heen gegaan om de mensen met wie PAX werkt aan vrede te leren kennen, maar de coronacrisis zette daar een streep door. Nu belt Timmerman ze stuk voor stuk op, om te zien hoe het coronavirus in de (post)conflictgebieden huishoudt. En of de machthebbers luisteren naar de bevolking, voor wie deze crisis bovenop de ellende komt waar ze al in zaten.

———-
Anna Timmerman in gesprek over vrede in tijden van corona
Aflevering 4: Kosovo
———-

Voor het vierde gesprek belt Anna met Jovana Radosavljevic, oprichtster van New Social Initiative in Kosovo, een partnerorganisatie van PAX. In Kosovo bestaan nog altijd grote spanningen tussen de Kosovaars-Albanese meerderheid en de Kosovaars-Servische minderheid. De bevolkingsgroepen leven compleet gescheiden van elkaar en spreken zelfs niet dezelfde taal. In deze gespannen situatie probeert NSI de stem van gewone burgers gehoord te krijgen. Ze organiseren ‘closed door’ sessies waar politiek gevoelige onderwerpen besproken kunnen worden en ontwikkelen online tools en webplatforms waar burgers alle plannen van lokale overheden kunnen lezen. Samen met PAX werkt NSI aan de programma’s citizen participation in local decision making en dealing with the past.

Anna: ‘Hallo Jovana, wat fijn om je te spreken. Helaas wel via Skype omdat we door het coronavirus voorlopig niet kunnen reizen, hoe gaat het met je?’

Jovana: “Ja, wat fijn om je te spreken. Het gaat goed met me, het is erg interessant om te zien hoe de situatie rondom corona zich hier ontwikkelt. Gelukkig zijn er nog niet veel mensen getroffen door het virus. Zoals je misschien weet is de regering hier in Kosovo een tijdje geleden gevallen, maar ondanks dat we dus eigenlijk geen regering hebben pakken ze de situatie heel goed aan. Ze waren meteen heel proactief, ook in het bereiken van de Servisch sprekende mensen hier.”

“Dit in tegenstelling tot Servië, waar het een grote rotzooi is. Daar maak ik me zorgen om, omdat dat ons hier in Noord-Kosovo ook raakt. De grens is officieel op slot maar er zijn allerlei geheime weggetjes gewoon open waardoor de grens zo lek als een mandje is. Alternatieve routes die normaal gesproken worden gebruikt als smokkelroutes, worden nu gebruikt om tussen Servië en Kosovo te reizen. In Servië hebben ze heel lang niets gedaan om corona in te dammen. Er moesten eerst nog verkiezingen gehouden worden dus werd de hele situatie gebagatelliseerd. Politici noemden het zelfs het belachelijke virus. Alles is nog open in Servië; nachtclubs, winkels, restaurants, overal zijn mensen. En ondertussen wordt er gelogen over het aantal getroffenen.”

“Dat is voor ons heel zorgelijk omdat we er tussenin zitten. Voor veel Kosovaarse-Serviërs was het onduidelijk welk beleid we moesten volgen, dat van Kosovo of dat van Servië? Welk beleid je volgt heeft grote invloed op hoe het verder gaat.”

Anna: ‘Mag je naar buiten?’

Jovana: “In Kosovo was het beleid eerst heel streng. Iedereen moest in quarantaine, mensen mochten alleen op bepaalde tijden naar buiten, naar de winkel of wandelen. Maar niemand mocht buiten zijn eigen stad of dorp. Nu zitten we in de tweede fase, iedereen heeft twee tijdslots per dag om naar buiten te gaan. Wij als NGO mogen nog niet naar kantoor. Misschien na 18 mei of 1 juni.”

Anna: ‘Hoe is het gezondheidssysteem in Kosovo?’

Jovana: “Dat zit heel complex in elkaar, eigenlijk heb je hier twee verschillende gezondheidssystemen. Een Kosovaars systeem en een Servisch systeem voor Kosovaarse-Serviërs. Dat laatste is het meest geavanceerd, dat is een mooie erfenis van het socialisme, toen gezondheidszorg gratis was. De Servische gezondheidszorg is nog steeds in veel betere staat dan de Kosovaarse maar deze pandemie heeft ook positieve uitwerkingen. Kosovo staat nu Servische dokters toe om hier te komen helpen. En voor het eerst was er een persconferentie waarin twee burgemeesters uit verschillende gebieden samen de mensen opriepen de Kosovaarse regels te volgen. Dat is een belangrijke stap tijdens een pandemie.”

Anna: ‘Is er een groot verschil tussen wat nationale en regionale politici zeggen en doen?’’

Jovana: “Zeker, als je een Serviër in Kosovo bent moet je altijd op twee niveaus naar de politiek kijken. De Kosovaarse overheid kwam meteen met een goede respons, helemaal gefocust op het indammen van de virusuitbraak. De Servische gemeenschap in Kosovo heeft maar 1 politieke partij, die alles beslist voor ons en volledige steun heeft van Belgrado. Er is geen enkele noemenswaardige oppositie. Dus bij de uitbraak van corona kunnen lokale politici niet ingaan tegen de wil van Belgrado. Wij hebben dus niemand hier waarbij we onze zorgen kunnen uiten. De mensen hier hebben ook geen vertrouwen in de Kosovaarse oppositie omdat er bijna geen communicatie is tussen de verschillende gemeenschappen.”

Anna: ‘Hoe past jullie werk in deze situatie?’

Jovana: “Toen we begonnen in 2017 wilden we in kaart brengen met welke problemen mensen worstelen en welke oplossingen nodig zijn. We wilden een maatschappij waarin we samenwerken en samen nadenken. De platforms die we, met behulp van PAX, hebben opgericht dienen als officiële website voor de regio’s. Daar kunnen mensen de informatie vinden waar ze recht op hebben. We moeten dat wel voorzichtig aanpakken, hoe komen we met oplossingen waar iedereen wat aan heeft zonder dat we mensen beledigen? Een van de grootste uitdagingen is dat we om moeten gaan met grieven uit het verleden, politici gebruiken die oude pijn nog steeds voor politiek gewin.”

“Aan de ene kant zeggen politici dat ze willen samenwerken, vooruit willen en verandering willen, zeker als ze met Brussel communiceren. Maar als ze met hun eigen achterban praten slaan ze een hele andere toon aan, zoals het niet erkennen van de staat Kosovo. Er is een groot gebrek aan bereidheid van Servië om de kwesties van het verleden aan te pakken. De volgende fase van de dialoog is zo ontzettend belangrijk. En juist het omgaan met het verleden moet centraal staan, dat is de kern van vooruitgang.”

“Helaas borduurt de Kosovaarse politiek voort op oude politiek, met mensen uit de oude regimes. En we hebben allemaal het slachtoffer syndroom, iedereen in de Westelijke Balkan ziet zichzelf als slachtoffer waardoor we niet verder komen. Daar spelen de media ook een cruciale rol in.”

Anna: je bent heel uitgesproken, heeft dat invloed op jouw veiligheid?

Jovana: “Ik ben nogal uitgesproken, ja. Ik wil het maatschappelijk middenveld in leven houden. In de Servische gemeenschap heeft het maatschappelijk middenveld geen goede reputatie. We worden gezien als buitenlandse krachten die de soevereiniteit ondermijnen. Het is moeilijk om die perceptie te veranderen, maar we blijven het proberen. Zelfs overheidsinstellingen willen niet echt met ons samenwerken. Als we te kritisch zijn en corruptie en gebrek aan oppositie zouden aankaarten, zouden we niet lang meer bestaan. We moeten nadenken over hoe we onze boodschap brengen. Dit is wel iets aan het veranderen. Mensen besteden nu niet zoveel aandacht aan ons. Dus we moeten goed nadenken over hoe we communiceren. Het is een langzaam proces, maar we gaan vooruit.”

Anna: ‘Houd je hoop?’

Jovana: “Absoluut! Maar het hangt allemaal af van de beleidsmakers, zij bepalen de toon. Het maatschappelijk middenveld kan maar een beetje doen en het gebrek aan politieke pluriformiteit baart me zorgen.”

Anna: ‘Zie je hierin een rol weggelegd voor vrouwen? Hebben zij een stem?’

Jovana: “Vergeleken met een paar decennia geleden is er enorme vooruitgang geboekt. Onze grondwet is ook heel inclusief, voor de wet zijn mannen en vrouwen helemaal gelijk. Maar ook al staan er steeds meer vrouwen op om een leidinggevende rol te eisen, zij hebben absoluut nog geen gelijke kansen. Vrouwen hebben geen posities waarin zij de beslissingen nemen. Ze mogen niet meepraten over serieuze zaken als veiligheid of de dialoog, dat zijn nog steeds mannenzaken. Vrouwen mogen meepraten over gendergelijkheid, haha. Dat moet veranderen, vrouwen moeten de leiding nemen en deze ook durven te pakken. Vrouwen moeten brutaler zijn!”

“Overal volgen meisjes nu onderwijs, ook op het platteland, ook Roma meisjes. Dat is heel goed. Maar ze moeten daarna nog steeds trouwen, kinderen krijgen en het huishouden doen. Vrouwen moeten wel vijf banen tegelijk doen, dat is geen goede positie om een carrière te starten.”

Anna: ‘Wat is je droom voor Kosovo?’

Jovana: “Ik wil dat de betrekkingen tussen Pristina en Belgrado normaliseren. Eén die als kern heeft; hoe om te gaan met het verleden en hoe gaan we dat aanpakken? Dat is de enige manier waarop we brandende kwesties zoals corruptie, een onderontwikkelde economie en werkloosheid kunnen aanpakken. Nu kunnen we niets doen, want het is voor politici altijd zo gemakkelijk om Servië de schuld van alle problemen te geven. Het is nog steeds niet veilig om dat als probleem op te werpen. Dit zijn grote dromen hoor! Maar na 2/3 van mijn leven in onzekerheid te hebben geleefd durf ik wel te zeggen dat iedereen hiervan droomt. Al twintig jaar kan niemand plannen maken omdat iedere kleine actie tot een nieuwe crisis kan leiden. Dus wat we echt nodig hebben, is meer stabiliteit zodat mensen eindelijk plannen kunnen gaan maken om hun leven te leven.”

Een betere omgang met een gewelddadig verleden, Europa

Categorieën
Mensenrechten Nieuwsbericht PAX

Beleggingsbeleid pensioenfondsen ietsje meer verantwoord

14-05-2020

Pensioenfondsen hebben meer beleid opgesteld dat rekening houdt met het risico dat bedrijven waarin zij beleggen, schade toebrengen aan mens of milieu. Het verantwoord beleggingsbeleid van de fondsen blijft echter op veel onderwerpen nog onvoldoende. Dat blijkt uit een nieuw onderzoek van de Eerlijke Pensioenwijzer.

De Eerlijke Pensioenwijzer beoordeelde van de tien grootste pensioenfondsen het publiek beschikbare beleggingsbeleid op 15 thema’s zoals mensenrechten, klimaatverandering en transparantie. In totaal gingen 44 scores omhoog, ten opzichte van vorig jaar, als gevolg van verbeteringen van het beleid.

Cor Oudes van PAX, namens de Eerlijke Pensioenwijzer: “Een aantal echt lage scores kruipt nu richting de voldoende, maar de pensioenfondsen moeten nog heel veel doen voordat we kunnen spreken over een duurzame pensioensector. De sector beheert in totaal 1400 miljard euro en kan daarmee wereldwijd echt een verschil maken.”

De pensioenfondsen scoren allemaal nog zeer slecht op de manier waarop zij bij beleggen rekening houden met de natuur en dierenwelzijn. Geen van de fondsen erkent zelfs de meest basale kernwaarden in de omgang met dieren. Alle fondsen scoren dan ook een 1 op dit onderwerp, de laagste score. Het enige lichtpuntje is dat de twee metaalfondsen (PME en PMT) besloten niet meer te beleggen in bedrijven die bont produceren. BPL Pensioen (het fonds voor de landbouw) sloot die bedrijven al uit. De pensioenfondsen hebben daarnaast nog vrijwel geen oog voor de negatieve impact die bedrijven kunnen hebben op het behoud van biodiversiteit.

PMT (metaal en techniek) zag negen scores omhoog gaan door beter beleid. Bij ABP, BPL Pensioen en Pensioenfonds Horeca en Catering gingen elk acht scores omhoog. ABP, BPL Pensioen en PMT scoren bijvoorbeeld flink hoger voor hun beleid op mensenrechten, PMT scoort voor dat thema nu als enige fonds een voldoende (een 6). Niet alle fondsen verbeterden hun beleid, het Pensioenfonds Vervoer (voor de transport- en logistieksector) voerde vrijwel geen verbeteringen door.

De pensioenfondsen ontwikkelden ook meer beleid op klimaatverandering en arbeidsrechten. De fondsen voerden in hun beleggingsbeleid om klimaatverandering tegen te gaan 23 verbeteringen door, het gros daarvan is voor rekening van ABP. Dankzij de verbeteringen scoort ABP voor klimaat nu het hoogste van de tien fondsen, het gaat echter alsnog slechts om een 4. Een van de redenen is dat het fonds voor overheid, onderwijs en politie nog veel te weinig ambitie toont bij het uitfaseren van olie en gas. Voor arbeidsrechten scoort de helft van de fondsen nu bijna een voldoende. Dat komt met name doordat zij zich aansloten bij internationale richtlijnen die bijvoorbeeld van bedrijven verlangen dat zij zorgen voor veilige werkomstandigheden. Verder ontwikkelden vier fondsen, waaronder Pensioenfonds Horeca en Catering, meer en beter beleid voor gezondheid. Ook op dat thema scoort echter nog geen van de fondsen een voldoende.

Lees het volledige rapport hier

Categorieën
Mensenrechten Nieuwsbericht PAX

PAX: actie EU nodig tegen Israëlische annexatie delen Westelijke Jordaanoever

14-05-2020

PAX roept de Europese ministers van Buitenlandse Zaken, inclusief minister Stef Blok, op tot concrete maatregelen te komen waaruit blijkt dat de voorgenomen Israëlische annexatie van delen van de Palestijnse bezette gebieden op de Westelijke Jordaanoever serieuze gevolgen zal hebben. Zo’n annexatie is namelijk een grove schending van internationaal recht, Rusland is voor eenzelfde vergrijp in de Krim ook gestraft.

De Europese ministers van Buitenlandse Zaken bespreken vrijdag 15 mei de dreigende Israëlische annexatie van delen van de Westelijke Jordaanoever. Verschillende EU-lidstaten, waaronder Frankrijk, en ook de Europese Hoge Vertegenwoordiger Josep Borrell, spraken al uit dat annexatie gevolgen zal hebben.

Het nieuwe Israëlische regeerakkoord, dat eind april 2020 werd afgesloten, stelt dat de Israëlische regering vanaf 1 juli 2020 kan overgaan tot de formele annexatie van bezet Palestijns gebied. Een dergelijke annexatie zou een flagrante schending van internationaal recht zijn. Met geweld land verwerven is verboden volgens internationaal recht. Iets dat het Internationaal Gerechtshof heeft bevestigd. Dit staat besloten in artikel 2(4) van het VN Handvest, de hoeksteen van het internationaal recht.

Rusland is ook gestraft

De mogelijke annexatie van de Westelijke Jordaanoever is tevens een ernstige inbreuk op het zelfbeschikkingsrecht van de Palestijnen. Een leven in waardigheid wordt voor hen zo onmogelijk gemaakt. Andere landen hebben de verplichting om geen hulp of assistentie te verlenen aan zo’n illegale situatie. Tegen Rusland zijn ook maatregelen genomen na de annexatie van de Krim. De EU moet aan Israël duidelijk maken dat daar nu ook sprake van zal zijn. Er valt te denken aan: opschorting en/of bevriezing van het EU-Israël Associatieakkoord, handelsbeperkingen, uitsluiting van deelname aan Europese programma’s, zoals Horizon Europe, en andere maatregelen zoals reisbeperkingen en bevriezen van tegoeden.

EU heeft een taak: vrede en recht beschermen

Annexatie is een te ernstige schending van het internationaal recht om alleen met woorden veroordeeld te worden. Als belangrijkste handelspartner van Israël en als hoeder van vrede en recht heeft de EU de mogelijkheid én de plicht om invloed uit te oefenen en de annexatie tegen te houden. Tevens moet de EU waken dat het verder uitbreiden van het E1 gebied niet ter tafel wordt gebracht als alternatief voor de annexatie van de Westelijke Jordaanoever. PAX roept daarom de Europese ministers van Buitenlandse Zaken op om morgen concrete maatregelen overeen te komen en de Israëlische regering duidelijk te maken dat annexatie van delen van de Westelijke Jordaanoever niet zonder serieuze consequenties zal blijven.

Midden-Oosten

Categorieën
Mensenrechten Nieuwsbericht PAX

14 mei Interreligieuze dag tegen coronapandemie

12-05-2020

De Rooms Katholieke Kerk zoekt in deze moeilijke tijd van het coronavirus de verbondenheid met alle mensen en roept op tot een interreligieuze dag waaraan iedereen, ongeacht religie, mee kan doen.

In zijn toespraak vanuit het raam van de bibliotheek in het Apostolisch Paleis sprak de paus onlangs zijn hoop uit op een vaccin tegen het coronavirus en steunde hij een interreligieuze gebeds- en vastendag op 14 mei om een einde te maken aan de pandemie.

De Pauselijke Raad voor de Interreligieuze Dialoog volgt hiermee de oproep van het ‘Hoger comité voor menselijke broederschap’, dat vorig jaar is opgericht als antwoord op het document over menselijke broederschap, ondertekend door paus Franciscus en sjeik Ahmed el-Tayeb, grootimam van Al-Azhar.

De secretaris-generaal van de VN, António Guterres, tweette ook zijn steun voor het ‘moment van reflectie, hoop en geloof’.

Categorieën
IDEA Mensenrechten Nieuwsbericht

Why collective parliamentary governance is more important than ever in a pandemic

Parliaments and Crisis is the new Parliamentary Primer produced by the INTER PARES project, funded by the European Union and delivered by International IDEA. Written in the context of the coronavirus pandemic, the Primer looks at how democratic parliaments play a crucial role in making good decisions and protecting citizens’ rights during a crisis.

The coronavirus pandemic has deeply impacted how we are governed. For example, Chile has amended its constitution to permit virtual parliamentary debate, Ireland’s parliament added protections in emergency legislation for people without permanent homes, and Brazil’s Senate enabled citizens to make comments in its online session platform. These examples show how democracies have had to adapt to operating under extreme time pressure, without losing the advantages of transparency, citizen voices, and effective policy feedback loops that make democracy the most effective and just governance system.

As the deadly nature of COVID-19 became apparent, states around the world had to rapidly ramp up health care responses, put in place social distancing measures to reduce infection spread, and provide economic support to growing numbers of people who lost work and income.

Parliaments are the core democratic institutions representing citizens throughout the policy cycle; in creating legislative rules that govern society, in ensuring that government implements legislated programmes effectively and fairly, in voting the use of taxpayers’ resources to pay for government services, and in ensuring the diverse views of citizens are heard at every stage. During a crisis, parliaments must carry out the same functions, but more rapidly, and in often adverse circumstances.

During the pandemic, democracies that acted effectively to manage health impacts were able to avoid draconian restrictions on human rights. South Korea, which was initially worst hit after China, was able to control the epidemic and restrict deaths to under 250 by 29 April, without introducing emergency powers legislation. South Korea even held a parliamentary election in April with a turnout of 66 per cent, the highest in 28 years. Finland’s parliament rigorously reviewed emergency powers legislation and amended it to enhance human rights protections. By the end of April, the country had one of the lowest COVID-19 mortality rates in Europe.

Based on a survey of actions taken by parliaments around the world during March 2020, Parliaments in Crisis explores how parliaments around the world have responded to the coronavirus pandemic, within a broader exploration of how parliaments can protect democratic principles and ensure good governance during crises. The Primer explores the different steps parliament took to: enable their continued functioning including through innovative solutions such as virtual sessions; give governments necessary powers to protect public health; conduct effective oversight of government actions particularly to ensure respect for citizen rights; and learn lessons from the crisis to feed into better planning and decision-making.

Parliaments are faced with four sometimes conflicting imperatives during a crisis. First, they must make quick but properly thought-out decisions, particularly on any emergency powers that governments need to be able to act quickly against the pandemic. Second, they need to ensure continuity of constitutional  governance and the balance of powers required by representative democracy. Third, they must set an example as an institution through observing health requirements like social distancing. Finally, MPs and staff have a right, and a duty, to protect themselves personally.

Most surveyed parliaments quickly took measures to address these different priorities, and typically, their measures evolved and improved as the crisis continued. The Primer documents examples from different countries around the world, ranging from basic safety measures such as limiting public access to the parliament to high-tech solutions like virtual plenary sessions.

The Primer focuses particularly on two aspects of parliaments’ responses. First, it looks at how parliaments ensured that emergency measures considered the needs of all parts of the population, and also that any emergency government powers were both limited in time and scope, and subject to proper parliamentary oversight. In several documented cases, parliaments amended proposed legislation to provide greater human rights protections. Second, the primer examines how parliaments implemented innovative solutions to enable virtual functioning, both through using conferencing technologies, and in adapting parliamentary rules, and even in one case the national constitution, to permit online debates and voting.

The Primer concludes in exploring how parliaments can play a key role both in reviewing how effectively government responded to the crisis, identifying lessons to be implemented in improved crisis and disaster planning, and also in launching inclusive national discussions on the longer-term implications of crises and disasters. Parliaments, representing diverse sectors and interests within a country, are uniquely placed to host inclusive discussion on deeper questions such as the relationship between disasters such as the pandemic and the sustainability of current economic models nationally and globally.

The Primer is one of several initiatives that INTER PARES is taking to support emerging parliaments deal with the pandemic and its aftermath. A series of best practice examples are being recorded and disseminated through the INTER PARES website, a comprehensive database of parliamentary responses globally is being collected to be presented through accessible infographics, and project partner parliaments around the world are being offered support through virtual technologies including e-learning courses.

DOWNLOAD THE PRIMER HERE

About the project: INTER PARES | Parliaments in Partnership – EU Global Project to Strengthen the Capacity of Parliaments is the first global parliamentary project of its kind. Funded by the EU and implemented by International IDEA, its purpose is to strengthen the capacity of parliaments in partner countries, by enhancing their legislative, oversight, representative, budgetary and administrative functions. It focuses both on elected Members of Parliament (MPs), particularly in their capacity as members of parliamentary committees and on the staff of parliaments’ secretariats.

Categorieën
IDEA Mensenrechten Nieuwsbericht

Supporting the EU as a global leader on Democracy: Read our Joint Statements on EU programming for external action 2021-2027

International IDEA co-drafted three position papers with recommendations on programming for democracy within the EU Neighbourhood, Development and International Cooperation Instrument (NDICI). The Statements are jointly published with the European Partnership for Democracy (EPD) and the European Network of Political Foundations (ENoP).

The recommendations aim at supporting the EU in its ambition to become a global leader on human rights and democracy and deliver a new geopolitical agenda[1]. While negotiations are ongoing on the next EU multi-annual financial framework, now is the time for the EU in Brussels and EU Delegations to set general democracy contours through the programming cycle. Integrating this priority will allow the EU to support democracy assistance projects in the years to come.

The full text of the Joints Statements can be consulted here:

  1. Joint Statement on geographic programming for democracy

Democratisation programmes should be a cross-cutting priority in EU’s development programming, including the geographic allocations. This will allow the EU to achieve its commitment to be a frontrunner in implementing the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and ambition to take up a global leadership on human rights and democracy. Read our recommendations on the level of funding, themes, funding modalities and procedures [here].

  1. Joint Statement on thematic programming on human rights and democracy

Strong democratic institutions and sound democratic processes help to enhance democratic delivery on the five key areas for external action set by the European Commission: sustainable growth, climate action, peace & governance, migration and digital development. Read our recommendations on how to operationalise this vision through thematic programming for human rights and democracy [here].

  1. Joint Statement on thematic programming for civil society organizations

Support to civil society is crucial for enhancing democratic accountability and fostering participation in democracy. The EU should enhance its efforts against shrinking civic space and in support of free media as cornerstones of democracy. Read our recommendations on how to empower civil society organizations through EU external action programming [here].

For more information about the Joint Statements and International IDEA’s partnership with the EU, please contact International IDEA’s Europe Office at idea.euo@idea.int